Dreambound
Blog

Graduate Nursing vs Registered Nurse

Graduate Nursing vs Registered Nurse

When it comes to pursuing a career in nursing, there are different paths that individuals can take. Two common options are becoming a graduate nurse or a registered nurse. While both roles involve providing care to patients, there are distinct differences between the two. In this blog post, we will explore what it means to be a graduate nurse and a registered nurse, the differences between the two, and the job description, education and training, as well as the career outlook and salary for each role.

Article continues after recommendations

Recommended for you

What is a Graduate Nursing and Registered Nurse?

Graduate Nursing:

A graduate nurse, also known as a newly graduated nurse or a new graduate nurse, is an individual who has recently completed their nursing education and has obtained their nursing degree. They have successfully passed their nursing board exams and are now eligible to practice as a nurse. However, graduate nurses are considered to be in the early stages of their nursing career and are still gaining experience and knowledge in the field.

Registered Nurse:

A registered nurse, on the other hand, is an individual who has completed their nursing education, passed their nursing board exams, and obtained their nursing license. Registered nurses have met the requirements set by their state's nursing board and are authorized to practice as nurses. They have gained experience and knowledge in the field and may have specialized in a specific area of nursing.

Difference between a Graduate Nursing and Registered Nurse:

The main difference between a graduate nurse and a registered nurse lies in their level of experience and knowledge in the nursing field. Here are some key distinctions between the two roles:

  1. Experience: Graduate nurses are newly graduated and have limited experience in the field, while registered nurses have gained more experience through their education and practice.

  2. Responsibilities: Graduate nurses often work under the supervision of registered nurses or other healthcare professionals. They may have more limited responsibilities compared to registered nurses who can work independently and have a broader scope of practice.

  3. Specialization: Graduate nurses typically have a general nursing education and may not have specialized in a specific area of nursing. Registered nurses, on the other hand, may have pursued further education or training to specialize in areas such as pediatrics, oncology, or critical care.

  4. Career Advancement: While both roles offer opportunities for career advancement, registered nurses have more options available to them. They can pursue advanced practice roles such as nurse practitioner, nurse anesthetist, or nurse midwife, which require additional education and certification.

Graduate Nursing vs Registered Nurse: Job Description

Graduate Nursing:

As a graduate nurse, your job description may include:

  • Assisting with patient care under the supervision of registered nurses or other healthcare professionals.
  • Administering medications as prescribed.
  • Monitoring patient vital signs and reporting any changes to the registered nurse.
  • Providing emotional support to patients and their families.
  • Documenting patient information and maintaining accurate records.

Registered Nurse:

As a registered nurse, your job description may include:

  • Assessing and evaluating patient conditions and developing care plans.
  • Administering medications and treatments as prescribed.
  • Performing diagnostic tests and analyzing the results.
  • Collaborating with other healthcare professionals to provide comprehensive patient care.
  • Educating patients and their families about health conditions and self-care.

Graduate Nursing vs Registered Nurse: Education and Training

Article continues after recommendations

More recommendations for you

Graduate Nursing:

To become a graduate nurse, you will need to complete a nursing program and obtain a nursing degree. This typically involves:

  • Completing a nursing program at an accredited institution, which can be either a diploma program, an associate degree in nursing (ADN), or a bachelor's degree in nursing (BSN).
  • Passing the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) to obtain your nursing license.

Registered Nurse:

To become a registered nurse, you will need to complete the same education and training as a graduate nurse. This includes:

  • Completing a nursing program at an accredited institution, which can be a diploma program, an ADN, or a BSN.
  • Passing the NCLEX-RN to obtain your nursing license.

However, registered nurses may also choose to pursue further education or training to specialize in a specific area of nursing. This can involve completing a master's degree in nursing (MSN) or obtaining certification in a specialized field.

Graduate Nursing vs Registered Nurse: Career Outlook and Salary

Career Outlook:

Both graduate nurses and registered nurses have promising career outlooks, as the demand for nurses continues to grow. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the employment of registered nurses is projected to grow 7% from 2019 to 2029, faster than the average for all occupations. This growth is due to factors such as an aging population, increased rates of chronic conditions, and the need for healthcare services.

Salary:

The salary for graduate nurses and registered nurses can vary depending on factors such as location, experience, and education. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median annual wage for registered nurses was $75,330 in May 2020. The lowest 10% earned less than $53,410, while the highest 10% earned more than $116,230.

Final Thoughts

Both graduate nursing and registered nursing offer rewarding careers in the healthcare field. Whether you choose to start your nursing career as a graduate nurse or pursue further education and training to become a registered nurse, you will have the opportunity to make a positive impact on the lives of others. Consider your personal goals and aspirations, as well as the education and training required for each role, to determine the best path for you in the nursing profession.

Dreambound extends its programs to various locations. Visit the suggested blogs to delve deeply into the intricate details of the two vocations, learning about their respective requirements and gaining valuable insights on how to kickstart your involvement:

Athena Kan
Written by
Athena Kan

Athena is Co-founder and CEO of Dreambound.

Share this post: