Dreambound
Blog

CPR-BLS vs Respiratory Therapist

CPR-BLS vs Respiratory Therapist

When it comes to careers in healthcare, there are numerous options to choose from. Two popular choices are becoming a CPR-BLS provider or a respiratory therapist. While both of these roles focus on providing care to individuals in need, there are some key differences between the two. In this blog post, we will explore what a CPR-BLS provider and a respiratory therapist do, the education and training required for each role, and the career outlook and salary potential for both professions.

Article continues after recommendations

Recommended for you

What is CPR-BLS and Respiratory Therapist?

Before we dive into the differences between a CPR-BLS provider and a respiratory therapist, let's first understand what each role entails.

CPR-BLS: CPR stands for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, while BLS stands for Basic Life Support. A CPR-BLS provider is trained in administering life-saving techniques in emergency situations. They are responsible for performing CPR, using an automated external defibrillator (AED), and providing basic first aid to individuals experiencing cardiac arrest or other life-threatening emergencies. CPR-BLS providers can be found in a variety of settings, including hospitals, clinics, schools, and public places.

Respiratory Therapist: A respiratory therapist is a healthcare professional who specializes in the treatment and management of patients with respiratory disorders. They are responsible for evaluating patients, conducting diagnostic tests, and developing treatment plans to help individuals breathe more easily. Respiratory therapists work closely with physicians and other healthcare professionals to provide care to patients with conditions such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and pneumonia. They can be found working in hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities, and home healthcare settings.

Difference between CPR-BLS and Respiratory Therapist

While both CPR-BLS providers and respiratory therapists work in the healthcare industry and focus on providing care to individuals in need, there are several key differences between the two roles:

  1. Scope of Practice: CPR-BLS providers are trained in basic life support techniques, including CPR and first aid. Their main focus is on responding to emergencies and providing immediate care until advanced medical help arrives. On the other hand, respiratory therapists have a broader scope of practice. They are trained in evaluating, diagnosing, and treating patients with respiratory disorders. They may administer medications, perform diagnostic tests, and provide ongoing care to patients with chronic respiratory conditions.

  2. Education and Training: The educational requirements for CPR-BLS providers and respiratory therapists also differ. To become a CPR-BLS provider, individuals typically need to complete a short training course, which can range from a few hours to a few days. This training provides instruction on basic life support techniques, including CPR, AED usage, and first aid. On the other hand, respiratory therapists must complete an accredited respiratory therapy program, which typically takes two to four years to complete. These programs include coursework in anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, and respiratory therapy techniques. Graduates of these programs are then eligible to sit for a national certification exam.

  3. Job Responsibilities: As mentioned earlier, CPR-BLS providers are primarily responsible for responding to emergencies and providing immediate care. They may work in a variety of settings, including hospitals, schools, and public places. In contrast, respiratory therapists have more extensive job responsibilities. They work closely with physicians to evaluate and treat patients with respiratory disorders. This may involve conducting diagnostic tests, administering medications, and providing ongoing care to patients. Respiratory therapists often work in hospitals, where they may be involved in the care of patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) or those on ventilators.

CPR-BLS vs Respiratory Therapist: Job Description

Now that we have explored the differences between CPR-BLS providers and respiratory therapists, let's take a closer look at the job descriptions for each role:

CPR-BLS Provider Job Description:

  • Administer CPR and first aid to individuals experiencing cardiac arrest or other life-threatening emergencies
  • Use an automated external defibrillator (AED) to restore normal heart rhythm
  • Provide basic life support until advanced medical help arrives
  • Educate individuals on CPR and first aid techniques
  • Maintain proper documentation and records of interventions performed

Respiratory Therapist Job Description:

  • Evaluate and assess patients with respiratory disorders
  • Perform diagnostic tests, such as pulmonary function tests and arterial blood gas analysis
  • Develop and implement treatment plans for patients with respiratory conditions
  • Administer medications, such as bronchodilators and oxygen therapy
  • Educate patients on proper respiratory care techniques
  • Monitor patients on mechanical ventilators or other respiratory support devices

CPR-BLS vs Respiratory Therapist: Education and Training

As mentioned earlier, the education and training requirements for CPR-BLS providers and respiratory therapists differ significantly. Here's a closer look at what it takes to pursue each career:

CPR-BLS Provider Education and Training:

  • Complete a CPR-BLS training course, which can range from a few hours to a few days
  • Learn how to administer CPR, use an AED, and provide basic first aid
  • Receive certification upon successful completion of the training course

Respiratory Therapist Education and Training:

  • Complete an accredited respiratory therapy program, which typically takes two to four years to complete
  • Coursework includes anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, and respiratory therapy techniques
  • Clinical rotations provide hands-on experience in various healthcare settings
  • Pass a national certification exam to become a licensed respiratory therapist

Article continues after recommendations

More recommendations for you

CPR-BLS vs Respiratory Therapist: Career Outlook and Salary

The career outlook and salary potential for CPR-BLS providers and respiratory therapists can vary significantly. Here's an overview of what you can expect in terms of career prospects and earnings:

CPR-BLS Provider Career Outlook and Salary:

  • The demand for CPR-BLS providers is expected to remain steady, as emergencies can happen at any time
  • Job opportunities can be found in a variety of settings, including hospitals, schools, and public places
  • The average salary for CPR-BLS providers varies depending on factors such as location and experience, but it is generally lower compared to respiratory therapists

Respiratory Therapist Career Outlook and Salary:

  • The demand for respiratory therapists is projected to grow rapidly due to an aging population and an increase in chronic respiratory conditions
  • Job opportunities are expected to be plentiful, especially in hospitals and long-term care facilities
  • The average salary for respiratory therapists is higher compared to CPR-BLS providers, reflecting the higher level of education and training required for this role

Final Thoughts

Both CPR-BLS providers and respiratory therapists play important roles in the healthcare industry, albeit with different scopes of practice and responsibilities. If you are looking for a career that focuses on emergency response and immediate care, becoming a CPR-BLS provider may be a good fit for you. On the other hand, if you are interested in working with patients with respiratory conditions and providing ongoing care, pursuing a career as a respiratory therapist may be the right choice. Ultimately, the decision comes down to your interests, career goals, and educational aspirations.

Dreambound strategically offers its educational programs in diverse locations. To gain a thorough insight into the exciting opportunities within these two vocations, we encourage you to explore more detailed information by visiting:

Arwena Payumo
Written by
Arwena Payumo
Share this post: