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Graduate Nursing vs Medical Transcriptionist

Graduate Nursing vs Medical Transcriptionist

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Are you interested in pursuing a career in the healthcare industry? There are many different paths you can take, depending on your interests and skills. Two popular options to consider are graduate nursing and medical transcriptionist. While both of these careers are in the healthcare field, they have some key differences. In this blog post, we will explore what each career entails, the education and training required, the job description for each role, and the career outlook and salary potential. By the end of this post, you should have a better understanding of which path is the right fit for you.

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Introduction

The healthcare industry is constantly growing and evolving, offering a wide range of career opportunities. Graduate nursing and medical transcriptionist are two such careers that offer stability and potential for growth. However, they require different skill sets and levels of education. Let's take a closer look at what each career entails.

What is a Graduate Nursing?

A graduate nurse is a registered nurse who has completed a graduate-level program in nursing. This advanced degree allows nurses to specialize in a particular area of healthcare and take on more complex roles and responsibilities. Graduate nursing programs typically include coursework in advanced nursing practice, research, leadership, and management.

What is a Medical Transcriptionist?

A medical transcriptionist, on the other hand, is a healthcare professional who converts voice recordings of medical professionals into written reports. These reports become part of a patient's medical records and are used for documentation, billing, and reference purposes. Medical transcriptionists need to have a strong understanding of medical terminology and be able to accurately transcribe and interpret medical dictation.

Difference between a Graduate Nursing and Medical Transcriptionist

While both graduate nursing and medical transcriptionist are careers in the healthcare industry, they have some key differences. Here are a few points to consider:

  • Education and Training: Graduate nursing requires a higher level of education, typically a master's degree in nursing. Medical transcriptionists, on the other hand, can enter the field with a postsecondary certificate or an associate degree.
  • Responsibilities: Graduate nurses are trained to provide direct patient care, including conducting physical assessments, administering medications, and developing care plans. Medical transcriptionists, on the other hand, are responsible for transcribing and editing medical reports, ensuring accuracy and completeness.
  • Job Outlook: The demand for graduate nurses is expected to grow due to an aging population and a shortage of healthcare professionals. Medical transcriptionists, however, may see a decline in job opportunities due to advances in speech recognition technology and the outsourcing of transcription services.

Graduate Nursing vs Medical Transcriptionist: Job Description

Let's take a closer look at the job description for each role to get a better understanding of the day-to-day responsibilities.

Job Description: Graduate Nursing

  • Conduct physical assessments of patients and record their medical history
  • Administer medications and treatments as prescribed by healthcare providers
  • Develop and implement care plans based on patient needs and healthcare goals
  • Collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure coordinated and effective patient care
  • Educate patients and their families on health promotion and disease prevention strategies
  • Monitor patient progress and make adjustments to care plans as necessary

Job Description: Medical Transcriptionist

  • Listen to voice recordings of medical professionals and transcribe them into written reports
  • Edit and proofread transcriptions for accuracy and completeness
  • Ensure that transcriptions are formatted correctly and adhere to medical transcription guidelines
  • Maintain confidentiality and security of patient information
  • Research and clarify medical terminology and abbreviations as needed
  • Communicate with healthcare providers to clarify dictation or obtain additional information

Graduate Nursing vs Medical Transcriptionist: Education and Training

The education and training requirements for graduate nursing and medical transcriptionist are quite different. Let's take a closer look at what each career path entails.

Education and Training: Graduate Nursing

  • Bachelor's degree in nursing (BSN) or an associate degree in nursing (ADN) followed by a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN)
  • Licensure as a registered nurse (RN)
  • Completion of a master's degree in nursing (MSN) with a specialization in a particular area of healthcare
  • Clinical experience and supervised practice in a healthcare setting
  • Continuing education to maintain licensure and stay updated on the latest advancements in healthcare

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Education and Training: Medical Transcriptionist

  • Postsecondary certificate or an associate degree in medical transcription or a related field
  • Courses in medical terminology, anatomy and physiology, pharmacology, and medical transcription techniques
  • On-the-job training to learn specific software and transcription guidelines
  • Continuing education to stay updated on changes in medical terminology and transcription practices

Graduate Nursing vs Medical Transcriptionist: Career Outlook and Salary

The career outlook and salary potential for graduate nursing and medical transcriptionist can vary. Let's explore these factors in more detail.

Career Outlook: Graduate Nursing

  • The demand for registered nurses is expected to grow by 7% between 2019 and 2029, faster than the average for all occupations.
  • Opportunities for graduate nurses may be particularly strong in areas such as primary care, geriatrics, and mental health.
  • The aging population and the increasing prevalence of chronic diseases are driving the demand for healthcare services.
  • Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs), such as nurse practitioners and nurse anesthetists, are in high demand due to their ability to provide primary care and perform specialized procedures.

Career Outlook: Medical Transcriptionist

  • The demand for medical transcriptionists is expected to decline by 2% between 2019 and 2029.
  • Advances in speech recognition technology and the outsourcing of transcription services are contributing to this decline.
  • However, there may still be opportunities for medical transcriptionists who specialize in specific areas, such as radiology or pathology.
  • Medical transcriptionists who are proficient in multiple languages may also have an advantage in the job market.

Salary: Graduate Nursing

  • According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median annual wage for registered nurses was $75,330 in May 2020.
  • The highest 10% of registered nurses earned more than $116,230, while the lowest 10% earned less than $53,410.
  • Salary can vary depending on factors such as location, level of experience, and specialization.

Salary: Medical Transcriptionist

  • According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median annual wage for medical transcriptionists was $34,770 in May 2020.
  • The highest 10% of medical transcriptionists earned more than $51,260, while the lowest 10% earned less than $23,490.
  • Salary can vary depending on factors such as location, level of experience, and work setting.

Final Thoughts

Both graduate nursing and medical transcriptionist are rewarding careers in the healthcare industry. However, they require different levels of education and training and offer different career opportunities. If you enjoy direct patient care and want to make a difference in people's lives, graduate nursing may be the right path for you. On the other hand, if you have excellent listening and typing skills and enjoy working behind the scenes, medical transcriptionist may be a better fit. Consider your interests, skills, and long-term career goals when making your decision.

Ensuring accessibility for individuals seeking growth, Dreambound strategically places its educational programs in various locations. Delve into a more comprehensive understanding of the exciting opportunities within these two vocations by visiting:

Alyssa Jane
Written by
Alyssa Jane

Alyssa Jane is part of the customer success team at Dreambound. She works with students, training providers, and employers, helping them have a smooth customer journey. She is also an ESL tutor and Licensed Psychometrician. She is fond of traveling, photography, and discovering new restaurants.

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